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Borderline personality disorder patients with versus without a history of suicide attempt

Leo Sher, M.D.

Individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are at increased risk for suicidal behavior. In DSM-5, BPD is the only personality disorder with suicidal or self-injurious behavior explicitly included in the diagnostic criteria (1). BPD has been shown to have higher associations with suicidal behaviors than major depressive disorder, another disorder with a suicide-related criterion (2). In our recent study, we compared clinical features of BPD patients with or without a history of suicide attempts and healthy volunteers (3).
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Testosterone and aggressive behavior in dominant and impulsive men

Leo Sher, M.D.

My “Commentary: Exogenous testosterone rapidly increases aggressive behavior in dominant and impulsive men” has been published in “Frontiers in Public Health” under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. Therefore, we can publish this article on the website, www.internetandpsychiatry.com  Citation: Sher L (2016) Commentary: Exogenous testosterone rapidly increases aggressive behavior in dominant and impulsive men. Front. Public Health 4:229. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2016.00229
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Sleep quality and cognitive functioning in combat veterans

Leo Sher, M.D.

Sleep disturbances are an important concern in combat veterans (1-4). Disordered sleep is the most common presenting problem among veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (2). A history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is also associated with sleep abnormalities (3). Considerable evidence suggests that sleep disorders may affect cognitive functioning (1,5-7). The Medical Dictionary defines cognitive function as “an intellectual process by which one becomes aware of, perceives, or comprehends ideas. It involves all aspects of perception, thinking, reasoning, and remembering” (8).
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American Medical Association’s health recommendations for New Year's resolutions

Leo Sher, M.D.

A healthy lifestyle is very important. Making just a few changes in your lifestyle can help you live longer.

As people were making New Year's resolutions, the American Medical Association (AMA) proposed recommendations to ensure a healthy lifestyle in 2017 (1). At the end of December 2016, the AMA made seven recommendations for a healthier new year:

1. Limit your intake of beverages with added sugar.

2. Evaluate your risk for type 2 diabetes — use the self–screening test at DoIHavePrediabetes.org.
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U.S. suicide rates rising

Simrat Kaur Sarai, M.D., Steven Lippmann, M.D. 

Suicide is one of the 10 leading causes of death, within all groups 10-64 years of age (1). Despite consistent declines from 1986-1999, the United States experienced a 24% increase in suicide rates between 1999-2014, rising to 10-13 per 100,000 people; such fatalities included males and females for all ages 10-74 years (2). Suicide among adolescents, young adults, and middle-age persons are rising (3,4).  Adults aged 45-64 evidenced some of the largest escalations, in women up to nearly 10 and among men almost 30 per 100,000 (2).  The average annual increase in the age-adjusted suicide frequency was about 1% each year during 1999-2006 and 2% annually from 2006-2014 (3).  The male incidence in 2014 was over three times higher than that of females.
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Decline in dementia among older adults in the United States

Leo Sher, M.D.

Dementia, a deterioration in memory and other cognitive functions that leads to a loss of independent function is a major medical and social problem. Alzheimer’s disease is the most frequent cause of dementia. Dementia can also be caused by a head injury, a stroke, a brain tumor, and other causes.

JAMA Internal Medicine has published an article entitled, “A comparison of the prevalence of dementia in the United States in 2000 and 2012” (1). The authors used data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative, population-based longitudinal survey of individuals in the United States 65 years or older.
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Zika is a sexually transmitted disease

Priyanga Jayakumar, M.D., Rajashekar Reddy Yeruva, M.D., Steven Lippmann, M.D.

Following zika epidemics in 2015, this virus infection became an issue of preventing transmission and eradication. A global threat, it induces serious congenital abnormalities and neurological diseases (1). Since this viral is sexually transmitted, there are behavioral means to prevent zika transmission.

Male-to-female sexually transmitted cases are reported (1). Female-to-male and male-to-male sexual transmission of zika virus are also documented (2,3). In those cases, the saliva, serum, vaginal fluid, cervical mucus, genital or endocervical swabs, and semen contained a high viral load (1-3).
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Don't you know I'm angry?: An analysis on the limited research on anger

Amy K. Grochala, B.A., Jess G. Fiedorowicz, M.D., Ph.D.

Anger is a ubiquitous human emotion that arises when a person feels that they have purposefully been wronged or their efforts to obtain some goals have been thwarted. It can be as mild as irritability or as extreme as rage, and can be kept inward or expressed outwardly in behaviors such as violence, aggression, or hostility to others (1). Whether kept inward or expressed outwardly, anger is typically considered a negative emotion. For example, the average score to a 5-point “attitude toward anger” scale was 1.5, where 1 equals strongly disagree and 5 equals strongly agree with statements that express liking the anger experience (2).
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