An Independent International Scientific Web Site to Promote Intellectual Values

Home

Cocaine dangerously contaminated with levamisole

Manasa Enja, M.D., Suneela Cherlopalle, M.D., Melanie Lippmann, M.D., Steven Lippmann, M.D.
         
Cocaine is a frequent drug of abuse and a common precipitant of health emergencies. Recently, cocaine has become an even more dangerous public health concern since being adulterated by the addition of levamisole.
 
It is hard to detect levamisole when mixed with cocaine; the addition of levamisole adds to the volume and appears to augment cocaine's stimulant effects. However, this agent often causes serious toxicity, which includes a vasculitic effect in the body, especially at the skin, bone marrow, lungs, kidneys, and vascular system. Such a drug reaction can be fatal.
Read more...

Congratulations to Professor Shih-Ku Lin!

Leo Sher, M.D.

On behalf of the World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Task Force on Men’s Mental Health I would like to congratulate Professor Shih-Ku Lin, a Member of the Task Force on becoming the President of the Society of Biological Psychiatry of Taiwan and wish Professor Shih-Ku Lin the best success in his work. Dr. Shih-Ku Lin is the Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Taipei City Hospital and Psychiatric Center and a Professor at the Taipei Medical University School of Medicine. Professor Shih-Ku Lin is also a Member of the Executive Committee and the Treasurer of the Asian College of Neuropsychopharmacology.

Read more...

The ideal body weight

Leo Sher, M.D.

The ideal body weight is usually described as a weight that is assumed to be maximally healthful for an individual, based mostly on height but modified by factors such as gender, age, build, and degree of muscular development. Ideal body weight is a definition originally introduced by life-insurance companies to describe the weight statistically associated with maximum life expectancy. The concept of the ideal body weight is related to the concept of the body mass index (BMI), a measure of body fat based on height and weight (bodyweight [kg]/height2 [m]). A formula for body mass was described in 1869 by Lambert Adolphe Jacques Quetelet (1796-1874), a Belgian scientist.
Read more...

Vitamin D

Leo Sher, M.D.

Vitamin D, also called calciferol is a lipid soluble vitamin which exists in two major forms: vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol, which is largely ingested) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol, which is synthesized in human body). Both forms are inactive form which are converted into active form by two enzymatic hydroxylation reactions, first in liver forming 25-hydroxyvitamin D mediated by 25-hydroxylase and second in kidney mediated by 1-alpha-hydroxylase forming the final activated product calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D).
Read more...

Examination of depressive signs and symptoms among 932 students in eight different secondary schools in Hungary

Sándor Kalmár, M.D., Ph.D.

Introduction
In the past decades the acceleration of the changes in our society puts an increasing burden on the mental mechanisms of people and the mental development of the youth. Unfortunately, in spite of the huge advances in neuroscience, the family and school rearing of children, the child psychological and the child psychiatric care system cannot cope with this increased task (Kalmár Patrícia, 2011).
Read more...

Blood volume and its regulation

Leo Sher, M.D.

Blood is a complex fluid which consists of plasma and of formed elements: red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The volume of blood in an average human adult is about 5 liters. Females generally have less blood volume than males. People who live at high altitudes, where the air contains less oxygen, may have more blood than people who live in low altitude regions. The extra blood delivers additional oxygen to body cells.
Read more...

Examination of psychological immune system among 932 students in eight different secondary schools in Hungary

Sándor Kalmár, M.D., Ph.D.

Introduction
This study based on an International Survey. In the past years Professor Aurel Nirestean, Emese Lukács and our colleagues made an examination in eight secondary schools and seven Universities in three countries. In the current study we did not investigate the psychiatric disorders but only the presence of sixteen psychological antibodies (Kalmár, 2013a).
Read more...

Antipsychotic medications and the treatment of PTSD

Jeffrey Goltz, M.D.

SSRIs are the first line pharmacological treatment for PTSD.  However, the response rate with SSRIs alone is typically <60%, with between 20-40% of patients achieving full remission.   Thus, many PTSD patients either have residual symptoms or are resistant to treatment with SSRIs.  This article will briefly review evidence for use of antipsychotic medication to help pharmacologically treat PTSD.

A variety of studies have been conducted to assess the efficacy of using antipsychotic medications for the treatment of PTSD.  The Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) is often used to measure the effectiveness of a medication for reducing PTSD symptoms.
Read more...